Our Winter 2018 Issue, Calls for Submissions, and a Welcome to Our New Assistant Editor

Happy New Year! Yes, we are still saying that because 2018 is off to such a great start here at Gyroscope Review. Our Winter Issue is now available, with our first-ever hand-drawn cover created by co-editor Constance Brewer.

The poets included in this issue include Alex Apuzzo, Jerrice J. Baptiste, Lizzie Bradley, Sylvia Cavanaugh, Wanda Morrow Clevenger, Diana Cole, Jin Cordaro, Maureen Daniels, T.M. De Vos, Catherine Edmunds, Joanne Esser, Samara Golabuk, Kate Hutchinson, Samantha Jacobs, Oonah Joslin, Mike Jurkovic, Steve Klepetar, Tricia Knoll, Sandra Kohler, Lenny Lianne, Laurinda Lind, Andy Macera, Peter Arvan Manos, Diane G. Martin, Sarah Merrow, Lyndi Bell O’Laughlin, Carl “Papa” Palmer, Irena Pasvinter, Adam Prince, Rush Rankin, henry 7. reneau, jr., Joni Renee, stephanie roberts, Bruce Robinson, Jen Sage-Robison, Matthew W. Schmeer, Ronald E. Shields, Samuel Son, Paul Strohm, Ed Werstein, Bill West, and Laura Madeline Wiseman.

Print copies are available for purchase HERE.

Kindle copies are available for purchase HERE.

As always, our PDF version is available HERE.

Spread the word!

But wait – that’s not all.

We have two calls for submissions open for our Spring 2018 issue. One is our general submissions category and the other is a themed category in honor of our third anniversary issue. The theme is “threes”.  Please follow the links to our submissions system HERE for further information. Both categories will remain open until March 15.

Finally, we extend a warm welcome to our new staff member, assistant editor Joshua A. Colwell. He joins us with plenty of experience working for small publications, an interest in writing, and a keen eye to finding just the kind of poetry we love here at Gyroscope Review: modern verse with plenty of bite. Josh is taking over our Twitter feed, so now’s the time to start following us if you haven’t already. We’re really glad he’s here. You can read more about him in our masthead.

 

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Wrap This Up, Too: Looking Back at 2017

We are now at the end of our first year of offering a print edition of Gyroscope Review and we thought, hey, let’s look at those numbers hanging out in our Submittable account. Just how many submissions did we get in 2017?

The answer: 1,854 submissions from 559 poets arrived on our virtual doorstep during the 2017 calendar year. No wonder our eyeballs need a holiday break. If we look at the percentage of what we accepted, an important bit of information for those of you considering where to send your work, our acceptance rate hovers slightly over 10%.

What about what we published during 2017? Those of you who ordered a copy of Wrap This Up: The 2017 Issues may already know the answer. We published 196 poems from 116 poets, 61 of whom were women. Poets published in our pages came mostly from the United States, but also represented Australia, Canada, Germany, Indonesia, Nigeria, Sweden, Turkey, and the UK. One more fun little fact: our youngest published poet, as far as we know, was an 18-year-old high school senior. We have no idea who our oldest poet was; we thought it might be a tad rude to ask. We don’t collect personal statistics  when poets send us work, so these results are gleaned from bios and mailing addresses in our submissions system.

What’s on tap for 2018? We are still working that out. Here’s what we do know: we will continue to offer the best possible work in digital and print formats. We will add a new staff member in January. We will encourage the sharing of poetry far and wide as a reflection of and refuge from this world of ours. And we will keep the dialogue going with everyone who works with us to keep our poetry community strong and welcoming.

Our next issue will be available January 15, 2018. Submissions for the Spring 2018 issue will also open the same day. As always, please review our guidelines before submitting.

Happy New Year from Gyroscope Review.

Image courtesy of Pixabay.com

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Book Review: Daphne and her Discontents

Book Review

Daphne and her Discontents by Jane Rosenberg LaForge

Published by Ravenna Press 2017

Jane Rosenberg LaForge’s new book Daphne and her Discontents delves into Greek mythology to explore the trials of Daphne and her relationship to LaForge’s own life. One of the first poems in the book, Family Business, chronicles LaForge’s childhood as part of a family of Jews that sells Christmas trees during the holiday season, and their search to avoid falling into the circumstances of their less fortunate neighbors. I was drawn into what it felt like to be an outcast in a season that steamrolls every religion that isn’t Christian.

Oh, how my mother loved Christmas . . . God how I hated it, because I hated being left out. (page 3)

In the following poems, LaForge goes on to explain the difficulties of being “a compliant daughter(page  6). One who embraces her family’s past. One whose mother resembles a tree, whose branches long to curl around and protect her family from unknown threats. As LaForge lists her faults before the gods, the reader feels LaForge’s resemblance to her mother. Both long for the rootedness of trees while at the same time plotting their escape from circumstances. Gods are flawed beings like her father, holding out and withdrawing affection with impunity, as a training tool.

“. . . the only thing I blame him for is confusing the myths of stones and trees, and what fathers and gods do with their children.” (page 37)

A parent’s lessons are repeated generationally, unable to transform as Daphne transformed to escape her fate. LaForge also embraces the past through her children, as in her poem Explaining the Holocaust to My Daughter (page 64). How do you explain the unexplainable? With gentleness. Despite it all, children understand.

Trees move through LaForge’s poems like wind through the branches. Trees and books become the method of transformation away from the past. In one poem she states, “I am Daphne because I cannot peel myself open(page 68), when in fact the whole book is the peeling away of layers, of the way family influences our innermost thoughts, the push-pull of Christianity against Judaism, the sense of place as a grounding mechanism, and the self-imposed fragility of Daphne despite her strong roots. In the final poem, Burnt by the sun god, LaForge laments; When the Dutch ruled the world, and the best parts of Russian novels had to be in French, my people were a hitch above mongrel. . . (page 74). Despite this, the love LaForge has for her family shines through.

I enjoyed reading Daphne and her Discontents, pausing to savor LaForge’s deft phrases and raw honesty. The poems wend their way through family and gods with equal intensity. I highly recommend this book.

Constance Brewer, Editor, Gyroscope Review

 

Daphne and her Discontents

by Jane Rosenberg LaForge

Published by Ravenna Press 2017

$11.95

Link to book

Web site, jane-rosenberg-laforge.com,

Author page on Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/Jane-Rosenberg-Laforge-Author-269805766510206/

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Wrap This Up: The 2017 Issues

We are pleased to announce that we have assembled all of our 2017 issues of Gyroscope Review in one place.

Wrap This Up: The 2017 Issues is available now on Amazon as either a print version ($20 plus shipping; free shipping with Amazon Prime) or a Kindle version ($9.99).

We are proud of our 2017 contributing poets and hope you want to read them all again in this collection. We are pretty sure this is the best holiday gift ever.

Thank you for reading!

 

 

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