Category Archives: Miscellaneous

The Underground is Coming Up!

Here it is halfway through October and I’m still wondering where summer went. This year seems to have gone swiftly. But one thing Gyroscope Review is doing slowly is adding more options for our readers. Months ago, we were proud to roll out a print edition for those of you that prefer the hands on experience. It involves extra time to create, but we think the end result is worth it.

This month we are also proud of our newest accomplishment. We now have a Kindle edition available for those of you that prefer an electronic version. I know I’m getting overwhelmed by books at my house, and have turned to electronic novels as a way of combating that. Sometimes the Kindle edition formatting leaves much to be desired, but it seems to have worked nicely for Gyroscope Review. Poems may take up two pages where in the print edition it’s only one, but that’s minor in the grand scheme of things. The print edition is in a large format at 8.5 in by 11 in. As always, the PDF version is available for computer, tablet and phone.

We are planning further changes in the upcoming months, including an overhaul of the website to bring you the freshest look and features. Gyroscope Review has come a long way from its humble beginnings, and we are excited about that. We are open to readers’ suggestions. Hit us up on Facebook or Twitter and let us know your thoughts. A future poll is possible. Technology is a wonderful tool.

Meanwhile, we’d like our submitting poets to focus on the upcoming Winter issue. If you’ve got any poems about the ‘underground’, (a loose interpretation) send them our way. Also in our Winter issue we will be trying something different. See if you can spot the change. Hope to read your work soon.

Poetry is not Dead!

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laptop office team

Heading into production

Today marks the end of the reading period for our fall issue, which means the next two weeks will consume us with producing the next edition of Gyroscope Review. Thank you to everyone who has sent us work to consider.

Now your editors have to kick it into high gear. As of the moment this post was written, we received 418 submissions. We don’t have our final numbers on acceptances just yet, but 21 pieces have been accepted so far. We have already said no to 300 pieces and 20 pieces have been withdrawn for various reasons including publication elsewhere. All remaining poems will be accepted or rejected this weekend. Every single piece we accept is Google-checked to make sure it is not already available for people to read or there is uncredited material from someone else’s work.

Then what happens? Then we do the time-consuming detailed work of downloading all the accepted files, formatting them to fit Gyroscope Review‘s standard look, putting them into an order that we think makes sense. We format the contributor’s bios. We make a big document of poems, bios, and table of contents, send it off to contributor’s as the authors’ proof copy. We create the cover layout. We write editorials. We hope that contributors take note of the deadline for any final corrections.

Several days before a new issue goes live, we upload the final version into CreateSpace. We go through a review process there to make sure the format will work in print. We also upload a PDF version of the new issue to this site under the tab, “Issues”. We send links for the new issue to contributors when everything is ready to go. We plaster our social media with links to the digital version, which has been free from the beginning, and the print version for which we currently charge $8.

We have a quarterly publishing schedule, which means we get to do this four time per year: January, April, July, and October. We have been releasing new issues on the first day of the month kicking off each quarter. However, we are making a slight modification with our upcoming winter issue. Instead of publishing the Winter 2018 issue on January 1, we are moving it to January 15. We would like to give ourselves a break over the holidays and we want authors to be able to look at authors’ proofs after the New Year instead of in the midst of holiday revelry.

Running a poetry journal is often rewarding. But it is also hard work, detailed work, and requires dedication. What we are clear about is that this is important work. Poets who put in the sweat to get their words just right deserve editors whose diligence honors that effort.

We sincerely hope we’ve risen to the occasion.

Stay tuned for our fall issue, scheduled for release on October 1. Happy autumn.

 

featured image courtesy of pixabay.com

 

 

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Irresistible, Seductive Bookstores and Why You Might Want a Print Copy of Gyroscope Review

 

Some of us go on vacation to unplug, hike, enjoy a different landscape. Writers tend to notice all the bookstores.
Our editor Kathleen Cassen Mickelson recently visited Ireland and kept seeing wonderful little bookstores that invited readers to curl up with a good book.
Where would you like to curl up with a good book this summer? Or, even better, a print copy of Gyroscope Review?
Did you know that any monies we receive from the sale of our print copies goes entirely back into the cost of running Gyroscope Review?
We do not ask for reading fees, nor do we ask for donations. But you can support us by buying a print copy of our journal and rest assured that the money you spend will help keep Gyroscope Review going for poets and readers everywhere.
Where you curl up to read is entirely up to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would like to purchase a print copy of the summer issue of Gyroscope Review, please click HERE.

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Free Verse Is Not a Free For All

Since today is Memorial Day, and Freedom is on my mind —

Free Verse Poetry, what’s that all about?” A question from a friend who is often bewildered by modern poetry in general. She likes reading it, but was raised in the grand tradition of Poetry That Rhymes. Don’t get me wrong, I love Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, Christina Rossetti and a plethora of other rhyming poets. I’ve just learned to widen my scope and dig for other influences. Most poets don’t spring forth from the head of Zeus, fully inspired. Neither do poems, although it would be grand if they did.

Wild Nights—Wild Nights!
Emily Dickinson

Wild Nights – Wild Nights!
Were I with thee
Wild Nights should be
Our luxury!

Futile – the winds –
To a heart in port –
Done with the compass –
Done with the chart!

Rowing in Eden –
Ah, the sea!
Might I moor – Tonight –
In thee!

Western poetical tradition (As opposed to Eastern or Oriental tradition) has a keen interest in poetical meter down to poetical feet per line. In the English language each foot usually has a syllable with a stress and one or two without a stress, presented in a pattern. Other languages may vary depending on the length of the vowels and the number of syllables in a word. Up until the last hundred years or so Iambic Pentameter was one of the most popular forms of meter in the English language. For examples, read Shakespeare. If you’re not interested, read him anyway, for the pure joy of how language should look on the page and sound in your mouth, or fall on your ear. At least listen to a good recording done by a British Shakespearean actor. Talk about rapt attention. Or maybe that’s just me.

Sonnet CXV
William Shakespeare

Those lines that I before have writ do lie,
Even those that said I could not love you dearer:
Yet then my judgment knew no reason why
My most full flame should afterwards burn clearer.
But reckoning Time, whose million’d accidents
Creep in ‘twixt vows, and change decrees of kings,
Tan sacred beauty, blunt the sharp’st intents,
Divert strong minds to the course of altering things;
Alas! why, fearing of Time’s tyranny,
Might I not then say, ‘Now I love you best,’
When I was certain o’er incertainty,
Crowning the present, doubting of the rest?
Love is a babe, then might I not say so,
To give full growth to that which still doth grow?

Popular opinion blames Walt Whitman for the downfall of rhymed poetry or the schism that occurred when he published Leaves of Grass and liberated poets to embrace free verse as a style. There was freedom to use poetry and language in a brand new way. Whitman wanted poetry to be ‘natural’, without the constraints of traditional meter and rhyme. I see the influence of Whitman on the Beat poets, on Ginsberg, and reading one then the other is an eye opening pleasure. We cannot escape our past, and as poets we need to mine the past for inspiration as much as we observe what is around us.

From a Wikipedia article: “Free verse is a term describing various styles of poetry that are not written using strict meter or rhyme, but that still are recognizable as ‘poetry’ by virtue of complex patterns of one sort or another that readers can perceive to be part of a coherent whole.”

Free verse is not totally without rules. Free verse poetry still has to hold together internally, to have cohesion and coherence, to make a point, to follow a pattern. In its own way, free verse is as rule bound as a sestina or villanelle. If you want to create a good free verse poem that is.

Kosmos
by Walt Whitman

WHO includes diversity, and is Nature,
Who is the amplitude of the earth, and the coarseness and sexuality of the earth, and the great charity of the earth, and the equilibrium also,
Who has not look’d forth from the windows, the eyes, for nothing, or whose brain held audience with messengers for nothing;
Who contains believers and disbelievers—Who is the most majestic lover;
Who holds duly his or her triune proportion of realism, spiritualism, and of the aesthetic, or intellectual,
Who, having consider’d the Body, finds all its organs and parts good;
Who, out of the theory of the earth, and of his or her body, understands by subtle analogies all other theories,
The theory of a city, a poem, and of the large politics of These States;
Who believes not only in our globe, with its sun and moon, but in other globes, with their suns and moons;
Who, constructing the house of himself or herself, not for a day, but for all time, sees races, eras, dates, generations,
The past, the future, dwelling there, like space, inseparable together.

Whenever I Saw You I Handed You a Bouquet, and
By Sharon Olds

what about those nosegays?! If you were to return
I would give you more, for all you have given us, for
your going first. Those posies might have a
peony, a freesia, a tulip — an eye snack
and nostril snack, I could not get enough of
giving you coronation bundles, handing them
and almost bowing, tongue-tied with
respectful adoring, with gobbling
the sight of you the sound, the bouquets saying mother-
— we would not be here, without your song, your eye.

Source: Poetry (February 2017)

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